|

Are Passion Fruit And Passion Flower The Same Heres What We Know

Have you ever heard about passion flowers? They have a unique and captivating appearance! I feel like they frequently resemble a coral reef with multicolored fish swimming about. Or maybe it is simply a figment of my mind.

Did you receive a tiny seedling as a gift? And are unsure if it will bear fruit? That is an excellent topic, because passion flowers are frequently used as decorations, yet they don’t always bear fruit! Passion flowers are strong vines native to the Americas that add a tropical feel to your landscape.

Are you curious whether passion fruit and passion flower are the same thing? My friends and relatives keep asking me about the same thing. Passion vine blooms are brightly colored, and some kinds yield passion fruit on their vines. Let us delve deeper into the topic of passion fruit and passion flower today. Keep reading to know more!

Passion Flower

There are over four hundred species in the genus Passiflora, the majority of which are indigenous to tropical and subtropical areas of the Americas. They have tiny roots and thrive in the understory of rain forests. Passion flower vines are cultivated only for their blossoms, and several distinct varieties of passion flower vines are produced for their flowers.

Just one Passiflora genera, Passiflora edulis Sims, bears the unqualified classification of passionfruit among all Passiflora species. In this species, there are two types of passion vine flowers: the conventional purple and the yellow.

Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa Deg. is the scientific name for the yellow form. Passiflora edulis produces tiny, round fruits in both of its passion flower types.

Not every passion flower, however, will produce fruit. At least not in the way you might imagine. The Passiflora edulis, which are utilized for fruit and which we can get and enjoy, are divided into two subgroups. The first is Passiflora edulis edulis, which produces the purple passion fruit that we are all familiar with.

Passiflora edulis flavicarpa, on the other hand, becomes yellow when the fruit is fully mature. There are also ornamental passion flower types in addition to these two. Each of them bears fruit, although there isn’t much information about them. They were developed for their blooms rather than their fruit. A few are horticultural hybrids, while others have been discovered in the wild.

And besides, the family Passiflora is somewhat widespread. There are additional Passiflora species that are strongly related to passion fruit but are really granadilla flowers. The term maracuja is frequently used, and it refers to passion fruit, granadilla, or both. It relies completely on who you ask.

How did the Passion Flower get its Name

The missionaries who first arrived in Brazil to promote Christianity gave the passion flower its title. The 5 stigmas of the blooms resembled the five wounds caused during Jesus’ crucifixion, and the flower was named after Jesus’ passion. As a result, the Latin name became Passiflora, which was then interpreted into plain English as passion flower.

The fruit that grew from this bloom was given the term passion fruit. The fruit already had a name in Latin America, which was and still is maracuja. Not just that, but the Passiflora genus includes granadilla (a fruit), therefore you’ll come across it when hunting for attractive blooms.

Passion fruit vs Passion flower

Indeed, the passion fruit and the passion flower are about the same plant! It is the most well-known member of the Passiflora genus, with some species yielding edible fruit and others utilized as ornamental plants. Passion flowers are frequently used as decorations because they grow rapidly and effectively, making them ideal for use as a fence covering or to conceal anything.

The hue of passion fruit ranges from purple to yellow-orange. Purple passion fruit is more vulnerable to soil illnesses and is more vulnerable to cold temps than its yellow version. Even though it is sweeter than yellow passion fruit, it is considerably more susceptible to illness and freezing temperatures, resulting in no fruit.

Why is there No Fruit on my Passion Vine

Purple passion fruit is more vulnerable to soil illnesses and is more sensitive to cold temperatures than its yellow version. Despite being sweeter than yellow passion fruit, it is considerably more susceptible to illness and freezing temperatures, resulting in a lack of fruit on the passion flower vine. As a result, the cultivar you choose to cultivate might be strongly correlated to why your passion flower is not bearing fruit.

When does my Passion Fruit get Ready to Pick

I am sure that you will need to know when to select your blooming vine after it is set and producing fruit. When passion fruit is ripe, it has an unpleasant tendency of slipping off the plant. It may truly take you off guard, and you will wake up one morning with five to eight fruits on the ground.

So, here are a few tips.

  • Take a peek at the fruit first. It should have a consistent hue and be somewhat wrinkled. It is possible that a flawlessly smooth fruit is nonetheless under ripe.
  • Then gently pull on the fruit. It will readily come off the vine if it is ripe; you will not need to pull hard.
  • Next, inspect the fruit itself for any remaining green tint.

This indicates that the fruit is ripening and is safe to pluck at this time. It will be somewhat under ripe when you get it home, but it will soften and mature over the following three to five days on the counter.

In conclusion, I hope you found my article on passion flower and passion fruit interesting! Like I mentioned earlier, the hue of passion fruit ranges from purple to yellow-orange. The passion fruit and the passion flower are basically the same plant. It is the most well-known member of the Passiflora genus, with some species yielding edible fruit and others utilized as ornamentals. Do you have any other food-related questions? Let me know your point of view and questions in the comments section below!

Similar Posts